The Idle Man – James Bond

Article up on theidleman.com – How To Dress Like James Bond

By Min A. Lee

An in-depth look into 007 reveals a complex protagonist with immaculate style. We examined a selection of Bond films for some of the best lessons in tailored menswear and accessories you’ll ever receive. You’ll be dressing like James Bond in no time!

Read more Men’s style guides.

While we are obsessed with the current James Bond, Daniel Craig, the iconic style that has become vital to bringing the literary character to life on the silver screen began with three men: Terence Young, Anthony Sinclair and Sean Connery.

TerenceYoung coached Connery into portraying the Bond that would set the bar since his first film Dr. No. Using his own bespoke tailor, Anthony Sinclair, Young felt everything worn by Bond was a huge proponent of the persona.

We asked Remmert van Braam, founder of the popular Bond Lifestyle, from the clothes to personality, what is it about James Bond that attracts men and women:

Bond always knows his stuff, from the wine he drinks to the car he drives, he knows what he wants and wants the best. This is something Bond creator Ian Fleming already put in the novels, naming specific brands and Bond’s sartorial preferences. Usually these are high-end, quality products. It might sound materialistic, but what men and women might admire in Bond is that even though he gets all the best things, he just as easily ruins bespoke suits, handmade shoes, or expensive vehicles and he doesn’t seem to care. Except of course when it’s his beloved Aston Martin DB5 (or his Bentley in the novels).

— Remmert van Braam, Bond Lifestyle

Clean silhouettes, easy shoulders, a slight flare to the jacket and movable fit define the Conduit Street tailor’s aesthetics. The British style embedded by Sinclair still translates across all of the 007 films to this day.

Let’s break down all of Bonds’ main looks, and how to achieve them.

The Tuxedo

Tuxedos appear heavily throughout the Bond movies. It’s important to remember, tuxedos are notably different from suits:

  • Suits can be worn anytime of the day, while formal tuxedos are for evening.
  • Color plays a role; tuxedos are usually black or extremely dark blue. Suits can be lighter shades.
  • Traditionally tuxedos will contain satin: the lapels, buttons, trimming down the trouser legs, while suits don’t.
  • The jacket lapels themselves are different. You won’t see tuxedos with notched lapels.
  • Tuxedos should have a bow tie versus wearing casual neck piece for suits.

Whenever we think of ‘Dr. No’, the first scene that comes to mind is that epic moment when through a cloud of cigarette smoke, Connery introduces himself as, Bond. James Bond. He was wearing a Sinclair designed tuxedo in midnight blue with a Lanvin shirt, these moments were the start of many.

The Grey Suit

Throughout the Connery era, Sinclair’s clean aesthetics were at the forefront. A popular style was his glen check three-piece suit in Goldfinger, featuring narrow lapels, ticket pocket along with the slip of a handkerchief and notched lapel waist coat.

Here’s Roger Moore working a grey, chalk stripe jacket with a peaked lapel. What’s the difference between pinstripes and chalk stripes? The latter is set wider, and sewn at an angle to mimic a tailor’s chalk line.

As time progressed, Brioni dressed Pierce Brosnan in neutral, but with a wider lapel with a higher gorge and no waist coat. The pleated trousers of Sinclair disappeared for slimmer cuts with darting.

Brioni was switched out for Tom Ford by “Quantum Of Solace.” While Craig did wear the Italian brand for one movie, a change in costume designer also influenced the change to Ford. Though there is variation between the designers of Bond’s suits, the fact remains from Sinclair to the more modern take we see now—grey is timeless.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE AND SHOP THE IDLE MAN – TOP MENSWEAR DESTINATION!

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Composure Magazine Story – Mesh It Up

Trend story written for Composure Magazine, read the full article and see the fashion here at composuremagazine.com.  Be sure to pick up a printed issue as well as view the newest Anniversary issue!

Design by Viajane.com

Audrey Magazine – Dailylook’s CEO/Founder Brian Ree

Get To Know Brian Ree, CEO And Founder Of DailyLook – Min A. Lee For Audrey Magazine 

Black Friday and Cyber Monday have just passed and after spending a couple of lunch breaks online haphazardly browsing through thousands of items on sale, we learned that e-retailer DailyLook’s simplified method of approaching quick trends with sleek curation was meant for us.  With nearly half a million followers on Facebook alone, DailyLook, caters to consumers by showing complete stylized looks, and is the only one of its kind growing at phenomenal speeds while backed by renowned investors like Brian Lee of the Honest Company and styling master and designer Rachel Zoe.  Founded in 2011 by CEO Brian Ree, the company initially built as a flash sale site is now a fully categorized ecommerce platform.  Though its evolution pushed towards a traditional online catalog model, the promotion of complete ensembles remains the main marketing approach that attracts new followers and members every day.

Quality with shopping made simple remain the backbone for Ree’s approach to online retail. Women can now experience their recently launched Elite personalized styling program.  With Elite you can experience having your own wardrobe stylist/personal shopper, but without the hassle of in-store appointments.  Ree shares with Audrey readers more in-depth details about his company along with how their newest monthly subscription venture functions and why it appeals to the young professional woman.

boxset.jpg

Audrey Magazine: When did you first decide to dive into the world of online retail and how did DailyLook come about?

Brian Ree: It was just over three years ago we found this company Dailylook, and the idea actually came about from at the time wanting to create a website that made it really easy to shop entire looks from head-to-toe.  The concept was really simple and was really about showcasing one new look every day and having that look available to purchase with just a few clicks.

AM: I understand you started as more of flash sale model. Looking at DailyLook now, what were some of the challenges of transitioning from a “flash” sale e-commerce platform to a more standardized model?

BR: We found customers loved shopping by looks, but they also wanted the ability to shop in a more traditional fashion of by category, so when we launched we didn’t have the ability to shop by any clothing categories.  We asked our customers what features they would like, and they wanted a feature that looked like the traditional catalog model. In return, we decided to add more features that would allow this.  That was our prompt to evolving the website to cater to our customers’ needs, but we always stayed true to the core of making it easy to browse and shop by looks, and we wanted to remain focused on head-to-toe styling for outfit ideas.

AM: How do you compete against consumer trends that call for more classic, investment style approaches to shopping versus the turnover of fast fashion?

BR: If you look at the way we style our pieces and our pricing, we are introducing new looks every day, so there is an element of fast trends and fast fashion in the way we merchandise our product assortment.  We have items that range from $20 all the way to $300, we do have some a bit more expensive.  We try to style our outfits in a way that the modern, young professional and contemporary woman does today which is really mixing highs and lows to create whatever look they’re trying to get, and that may be pairing a lower price top and skirt with a more investment statement piece like a nicer jacket or sweater.  In terms of merchandising, generally we’re not super low nor on the low price end.  We go from a Zara price point to a Shopbop price point without losing quality.  We carry some brands that Shopbop and Revolve carry, so we have a bit of overlap there, but we have the in-house DailyLook brands and products that are all under $100.  The DailyLook products range between $40 to $100.

AM: What future hopes do you have your current company and what sort of impact do you hope to make on the online retail world?

BR: Our mission was always to inspire women to dress their best and attain the look that they want to create for themselves. We have taken it one step further to make it easier by introducing our online personal styling experience which is what we’re most excited about and we’re seeing the most growth with.  Basically, a user signs up and fills out a style profile which is then submitted to the styling team and matched to the best stylist according to their answers.  That stylist every month will curate 6 to 8 items in a box set to be sent directly to your home on a date you chose and you get to try on items at home and only pay for what you keep.  There’s no risk, because if you don’t like anything you can return everything very easily.  It’s an experience that allows personal styling to be accessible.  It’s not to say people need styling, but you can think of it as a personal shopper.  You might be really busy, and you know what you like but you don’t have time to shop, so to have someone always able to look out for you and think of the best items and have it conveniently sent to you it has resonated really well.  In the first month we signed up 1000 elite prescription customers.  It’s the fasted growing business we made and it’s surpassed all our expectations.  No one else offers it, and hopefully it will continue to grow.

AM: If you could turn back time, would you still create a massively growing start-up with all the stress and time involved with building a large following and revenue?  

BR: I would, actually. I’ve always had the ambition to try to innovate businesses in a way that is meaningful and can add a lot of value to a lot of people and their lives.  Generally it would be technology– a way that you can create technology on a platform that allows you to impact a lot of lives in a positive way.  In this case technology and fashion: if you think about personal styling as whole and shopping, it’s something you would only think of being available to those with the financial capability to partake in it, but it’s a fairly cumbersome process even with money because not everyone has time to schedule an appointment and then go there at a specific time.  There’s only a handful of select clients that would have stylists come to their house, but it’s a very small subset.  We created this model of personal styling and personal shopping to anyone via the internet because we’re able to make the process really efficient and allow the stylist to effectively use their time to help everyone.        – See more and the full interview along with pictures at: http://audreymagazine.com/get-to-know-brian-ree-ceo-and-founder-of-dailylook/#sthash.fgUyjjGN.dpuf

Images Courtesy Of Audrey Magazine Via DailyLook

 

Audrey Magazine – Interview With KUMANN’S Yoo Hye Jin

Article Written For Audrey Magazine

Inside South Korean Label KUMANN YOO HYE JIN by Min A. Lee

“Futuristic Folklore” is a befitting title to understanding HyeJin Yoo’s perspectives on spring fashion with her presentation for KUMANN YOO HYE JIN 2015.  This isn’t a collection for those who prefer safer, ready-to-wear lines. This is about appreciating symbolism, engineering and a bit of mathematics.  Beauty is found within the heavily structured looks with a nod towards today’s science fiction animation and technology printed on pastel jacquards, organzas and cottons.  Yes, those are definitely spaceships.  If you aren’t into sci-fi, she has equally interesting and provoking designs in neutral to bright shades.

Yoo works endlessly to create masterpieces that are becoming the future we can expect from the Kumann studio, while she continues to build stability for the label.  We knew viewing her clothing would bring thoughtful discussion, so we reached out to learn more about this designer that expertly molds together so many contrasting ideas into a well-balanced and fluid collection.

Audrey Magazine: When you became the head of Kumann, how did you want to redefine the label, and how do feel that style translates into your current SS 2015 collection?

HyeJin Yoo: Kumann is the name originated from the early studio of the company. When I decided to start working on the label, I felt that I needed to reconsider the story of the studio, and its original value and identity. I have been re-identifying the brand’s characters in constructive design and original graphic patterns, which are based on different concepts of seasonal collections. Particularly, for spring and summer 2015, I interpret the concept of the future and folklore with specific color arrangements and computer-embroidered spaceship images made in 3D graphics.

AM: With the SS 2015 concept of “Futuristic Folklore,” have you always had an interest in those patterns and sci-fi animation?  What inspired you to put the two concepts together as one?

HJY: Sci-fi movies and ideas of cyborgs have been greatly influencing my ideas. I am directing the brand as a high-end boutique, but I do love to mix it up with images and symbols from sub-culture. I have also been very much interested in the theoretical ideas of time and space in a parallel universe, and in Buddhism. Basically, I think that people are very accustomed to a dichotomous way of thinking. Dualism affects our perceptions and languages by dividing things in the extreme, but I think that any of those two extremes could be blended just like other previous concepts, ‘Nostalgic Future’ and ‘Urban Shamanist’.

AM: What sort of emotions do you hope to evoke for viewers and wearers of your designs?

HJY: I am drawing a woman who wears uniqueness and originality of her own. I hope both viewers and wearers have exceptional experiences and at the same time will feel assertive and happy. – See the entire interview and more at: http://audreymagazine.com/inside-south-korean-label-kumann-yoo-hye-jin/#sthash.osq7wgVB.dpuf

 

Audrey Magazine: Korean Designer Tae-yong Ko Interview

Interview With Successful South Korean Fashion Designer Tae-yong Ko Of Beyond Closet, View The Full Article With Imagery Here.

Korea Herald hails Tae-yong Ko as one of South Korea’s most popular and sought after designers.  In the midst of working on his upcoming international collections, and appearing alongside celebrities Zico from Block B and P.O for the television show Fashion King Korea’s second season, we were able to catch up with the busy designer after two very successful and critiqued showings during New York and Seoul’s Fashion Weeks.  Ko shares with us his aspirations for his brand Beyond Closet, some favorite moments from both the spring 2015 shows and an in-depth look into the most recent collection. – See more at: http://audreymagazine.com/seoul-fashion-week-interview-tae-yong-ko/#sthash.6o61EYaD.dpuf

Fashion Writing – Deola + Clan

Article For Magazine Done Last Year

A Fashion Week Debut Full Of Luxurious Textiles, Plus A Mix Of Bright Hues & Playful Youthfulness – Min A. Lee

Deola Sagoe and Clan (which is made up of Sagoe’s daughters Teni, Tiwa an Aba) successfully presented their New York Fashion Week debut collections full of color, youth and luxurious textiles.  Looking at the designs of Sagoe one can see how she draws upon Nigeria in a lovely mix tradition and current aesthetics in the fashion world.  Her line is filled of body conscious cuts with conversation-starting details from cut-out patterns to an iridescent sheen for shifting colors and then adding in echoes of Nigerian fabric patterns, all brought beautifully onto the main stages of New York.  We can see why Deola Sagoe is gaining world-wide notoriety and praise.

As we watched the models glide towards us, we could feel the bold presence in her designs—they truly speak for themselves.  This line is not meant to be taken lightly, but worn for that occasion you want to stand out.  Even in the neutral looks there are features that instantly pop out at viewers.  We hope to see more of Sagoe at the coming fashion week industry events and anticipate her future collections.

CLAN

CLAN interests us with their take on clothing collection availability.  While nearly all designers offer two main collections, one for fall/winter and one for spring/summer, CLAN decided to create truly timeless designs in the sense that “these pieces will be available all year round in chosen variations and upon personal requests,” explained Teni Sagoe.

While viewing the debut, we felt an immediate sense of playful, youth with a bit of urban wear appeal.  Amping up the paints with open-mesh appeal, draping and mixed-media was a fresh take for the on-going trend.  One of our favorites was a phonetic spelling for laid back (laid-back) splashed across a silky top.

A perfect descriptor for parts of the CLAN collection with its easy-to-wear designs and casual coolness.  There’s even a comfort appeal to the more complicated designs we appreciate.   When it comes to fashion, we are always on the hunt for compelling designs with functionality.

Fashion Writing – Teddy Stratford Shirts & Audrey Magazine

Article written for Audrey Magazine, read the full piece here.

How the Police of Bangkok Inspired a New York City Dress Shirt Company

 

Normally, National Public Radio (NPR) is considered at the forefront of distributing news and cultural programming, not as a media outlet for fashion. But one podcast is beginning to change how the global fashion industry is viewed.  Rather than a constant stream of modern trends and red carpet celebrity drama, which at times feels more like a reality television show, NPR host Jacki Lyden was given the task of presenting the topic in a way that will appeal to listeners.

Regarding her new production, she explained, “We have to do it as anthropology—and more like a salon of the air.  That’s where public radio audiences would come in—in the amazing cultural context of fashion, and as business, diversity, history, entertainment and social commentary.”  Hence, The Seams: Clothing Is Our Common Thread: In Every Stitch, A Story was born, and from its recent beginnings Lyden has used the world as a palette and shared stories that force us to think about fashion as a complex, yet engaging academic conversation instead of an image roll of pretty outfits.

Lyden’s first episode on theseams.org pulled us into the streets of Bangkok with entrepreneur Bryan Davis, who credits his extreme fascination with the police attire of the city as an influential obsession that would lead him on a successful kickstarter campaign for a patented dress shirt.

“I was reading about the police department, so I was particularly tuned into the police, and I noticed the police had these awesome uniforms, these really close fitting, sharp uniforms,” Davis states during the recording.

During a traffic stop, Davis found an opportune moment to question the officer where the uniform was from.

Luckily, instead of a ticket, he received an address for a local tailor, “My friend and I walk in to the tailor’s…she’s got to translate.  But what’s interesting in Bangkok is that the police all get their uniforms completely custom made.  This tailor was measuring me up asking, ‘Do you want cuffs on these pants,’ and all this stuff and then he got to a point where my friend couldn’t translate she didn’t know the word apparently for zipper…I want a zipper I’ve never seen that before!”

Taking inspiration from the uniform, Davis enlisted the partnership of master tailor Carl Goldberg and launched the company Teddy Stratford.  Using campaign money, the “Zip Fit Shirt” was released featuring a zipper hidden under a faux button placket to create a slim, stream-lined look.  In order to maintain the high quality that can be easily lost with mass production, all shirts are hand made in New York City with a retail price of approximately $185.

This experience shows us how every piece of clothing we have carries with it some anthropological and/or sociological aspect.  Clothing isn’t only just a reflection of individualism, but part of a giant industry that battles financial and ethical concerns along the way, which is what Lyden’s series for NPR hopes to address to a growing consumership.  As the podcast advances, we aim to share with you more compelling features, and if you are interested in listening in, visit theseams.org to check out the latest aired episodes. – See more at: http://audreymagazine.com/how-the-police-of-bangkok-inspired-a-new-york-city-dress-shirt-company/#sthash.GYQQbp54.dpuf

Fashion Article – Iikonee

Fashion Article Written For Feature Brand – Iikonee

For those of us living metropolitan lives, caught in the constant daily movements between coffee and career, Iikonee lets us slow down and learn an appreciation for simplicity.  Clothing becomes a reflection of our lives, and there is beautiful classicism to be found within the line’s Spring & Summer 2015 looks.  Vivid white offset by classic navy and black make up the entire architecturally inspired collection, but with comfort and ease.  Spring usually entails overcrowded patterns and bright, summery palettes, but Iikonee keeps to traditional minimalist expectations.

  • Most minimalist designs tend to veer away from girly flirtation, but there is still a perfect dose of feminine appeal with curve flattering shapes and shorter lengths.  While on trend with the midi-skirt and contemporary boxy cuts for their available tops, the ability to wear these pieces over several years is not lost, especially as fads come back just as much as they disperse.  If you’re seeking out a revamp for your career wardrobe and want to move away from the usual suiting options, Iikonee should be at the top of your list.